PodcastED: SUFS president Doug Tuthill interviews ReSchool Colorado executive director Amy Anderson

redefinED staff

In this episode, Tuthill talks with the leader of a nonprofit organization committed to modernizing public education, creating the conditions for more expansive learning in an evolving society. Put simply, ReSchool Colorado’s mission is to leverage and reorganize existing assets and resources in a purposeful way around the needs of children and families.

The two policy innovators go deep discussing out-of-school learning and the growing inequity between families who can access the “shadow education system” and those who cannot. They also discuss the importance of integrating local communities into a competency-based education system.

Anderson believes that while change in public education can be slow, organizations like ReSchool Colorado can avoid competing with traditional district models by focusing on education outside of traditional brick-and-mortar schools.

“Wealthier families are spending thousands of dollars more per year per kid than lower-income families to access learning that is happening (through) sports, arts, STEM, summer camps, travel. That is where kids develop their sense of self … Those things have long-term implications on a person’s future, well-being, and economic success.”

EPISODE DETAILS:

  • ReSchool Colorado’s work to co-design an education system and give shared ownership to the broader community focused especially on the most marginalized members
  • How to close a growing equity gap for out-of-school learning and to direct resources to lower-income families
  • Building new accountability systems for a broader definition of public education through credentialing
  • Virtual reality as a vehicle for narrowing inequities
  • The changing role of the teacher in a broader definition of public education and the professional development necessary to adapt

LINKS MENTIONED:

The 74: 5 ways to reinvent school vacation – Amy Anderson and Julia Freeland Fisher

The 74: Cleveland schools consider mastery-based education to stem coronavirus learning loss

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