Terry M. Moe

Terry M. Moe is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of the Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 education, and the William Bennett Munro Professor of political science at Stanford University.

He is an expert on educational policy, U.S. political institutions, and organization theory. His current research projects are concerned with school choice, public bureaucracy, and the presidency.

Moe has written extensively on educational issues. His book (with John E. Chubb), Politics, Markets, and America’s Schools, is among the most influential and controversial works on education to be published during the last decade, and has been a major force in the movement for school choice in America and abroad.

He is also the author of Schools, Vouchers, and the American Public, the first detailed analysis of public opinion on the voucher issue. In addition, he is editor of A Primer on America’s Schools (Hoover Press, 2001), which provides a critical assessment of the current state of American education, and Private Vouchers (Hoover Press, 1995), the first book to be published on the growing movement among private-sector foundations to provide vouchers for low-income children.

More generally, Moe has written extensively on public bureaucracy and the presidency, and he is a leading figure in both fields. His influential articles on bureaucracy include “The New Economics of Organization,” “The Politics of Bureaucratic Structure,” “Political Institutions: The Neglected Side of the Story,” and “The Institutional Foundations of Democratic Government: A Comparison of Presidential and Parliamentary Systems.”

Among his articles on the presidency are “The Politicized Presidency,” “Presidents, Institutions, and Theory,” and “The President and the Bureaucracy: The Presidential Advantage.”

In 2005, Moe received the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation Prize for Excellence in Education.

In addition to his positions at Stanford and Hoover, Moe has served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute in Washington D.C.